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Triumph Over Adversity: A Musical Journey Through African American Poetry

from Cleveland Institute of Music

Program image

Poetic works by Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Maya Angelou, and other notable African American authors are analyzed and explored in this robust videoconference from the Cleveland Institute of Music. Through the videoconference, we will take a look at how musical settings affect the meaning, interpretation and impact of the poetic text. Students will orally interpret various poems, listen to live music performances, and play the role of lyricist as their own poems are set to blues music live during the class.

Program Rating

   based on 10 evaluation(s).


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About This Program

Cost

Point to Point: $180.00
By Request: $180.00



Length

45 minutes


Target Audience

Education: Grade(s) 9, 10, 11, 12

Minimum participants:

No Minimum

Maximum participants:

30


Primary Disciplines

Language Arts/English, Performing Arts, Literacy, Writing, Reading


Program Delivery Mode

Videoconference - H.323 (Polycom, Cisco/Tandberg, LifeSize, etc...)
Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Zoom, Skype, iChat, Vidyo, Movi/Jabber, Blue Jeans, etc...)



Booking Information

This session is scheduled on demand.

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Receive this program and 9 more for one low price when you purchase the CILC Virtual Expeditions package. Learn more

For more information contact CILC at (507) 388-3672

Provider's Cancellation Policy

Once arranged, distance learning offerings are very difficult and often impossible to re-schedule. The policy of the Cleveland Institute of Music (CIM) concerning distance learning scheduling and registration is as follows:

CIM does not allow the video or audio recording of our distance learning presentations.
Registration for distance learning programs must occur at least four weeks prior to the program date.
Upon confirmation of registration, payment of fees will be considered due, and distance learning clients will be invoiced for all applicable fees. Fees paid to CIM for distance learning programs are non-refundable, except in the case of school closings and other emergencies.
Requests for schedule changes made 10 or more days prior to the program date will be considered but not guaranteed.
Requests for schedule changes made less than 10 days prior to the program date will not be considered
Payments are due regardless of any schedule changes or cancellations.
Please note that all times are Eastern Standard Time.

About This Provider

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Cleveland Institute of Music

Cleveland, OH
United States

The Cleveland Institute of Music is a leading international conservatory that is distinguished by an exceptional degree of collaboration between students and teachers. This same stimulating environment extends to the Institute's community education programs, which help people of all ages realize their full musical potential.

CIM offers many exciting distance learning programs for Pre-K through high school. These programs are informative, fun and highly interactive. In addition to a full array of programs and courses in music, CIM offers a series of interdisciplinary programs that address academic content standards in science, math, language arts, and history. These programs are designed to enliven and reinforce the academic core curriculum

Contact:
Contact Alisa Andrews about scheduling.
samm@norsoft.net
2167953150

Program Details

Format

1. Discussion of various poems by African American authors
2. Students give oral interpretation of a poem assigned from pre-conference lessons
3. Discussion of each poem- background, interpretation, etc.
4. Performance of musical interpretation of each poem, followed by discussion
5. Live performance of students’ blues lyrics by CIM Blues Combo.

Objectives

Students will analyze poems by various African American authors through writing and oral interpretation.
Students will explore ways that poetry can be used as song lyrics, and how this affects the meaning of the poems.
Students will write their own poetic lyrics, which will be performed live by CIM musicians.

Standards Alignment

National Standards

COMMON CORE STANDARDS: ELA for a complete listing, please visit www.cim.edu/dl

Reading Standards for Literature
Key Ideas and Details
Grades 9-10
RL.9-10.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RL.9-10.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Grades 11-12
RL.11-12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
Craft and Structure
Grades 9-10
RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone Grades 11-12
RL.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful.
RL.11-12.6. Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Grades 9-10
RL.9-10.7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.
Grades 11-12
RL.11-12.7. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
RL.11-12.9. Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
Grades 9-10
RL.9-10.10. By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9–10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Grades 11-12
RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Writing Standards
Text types and purposes
Grades 9-10
W.9-10.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Grades 11-12
W.11-12.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Production and Distribution of Writing
Grades 9-10
W.9-10.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
W.9-10.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
W.9-10.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
Grades 11-12
W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Grades 9-10
W.9-10.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Apply grades 9–10 Reading standards to literature

Grades 11-12
W.11-12.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Range of Writing
Grades 9-10
W.9-10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Grades 11-12
W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes

Music
4. Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines.

6. Listening to, analyzing, and describing music.

7. Evaluating music and music performances.

8. Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

9. Understanding music in relation to history and culture.

State Standards

Perceiving/Knowing/Creating
HS I - Beginning
3CE Recognize and describe the elements of music.
4CE Listen to and compare various musical styles from the United States, other cultures and historical periods.
5CE Identify musical forms used in vocal and instrumental genres from various historical periods.
6CE Identify the social contexts from which music of various cultures evolved.
8CE Explain the role of technology in researching, creating, performing and listening to music.
HS II- Developing
3CE Listen to, analyze and describe various music works on the basis of their stylistic qualities and the historical and cultural contexts in which they were created.
4CE Describe the elements of music and their functions.
7CE Identify musical forms used in vocal and instrumental genres from world cultures.
8CE Describe how music reflects the social and political events of history and the role of the musician in history and culture.
HS III- Intermediate
2CE Using appropriate musical terminology, critique various music styles from the United States other cultures and historical periods.
5CE Compare and contrast musical forms used in vocal and instrumental genres.
HS IV- Mastery
3CE Analyze various music works from a variety of world cultures, identifying the unique features of expressive content (e.g. role of dynamics, movement, sounds of language-pronunciation and tone colors, style, instruments and accompaniment and ornamentation) and determine how these characteristics contribute to performance style while minimizing stylistic bias.
7CE Recognize aesthetic characteristics common to all art forms.
Responding/Reflecting
HS I - Beginning
2RE Respond to aesthetic qualities of a performance using music terminology.
3RE Examine how people from different backgrounds and cultures use and respond to music.
4RE Evaluate the use of the elements of music as relative to expression in a varied repertoire of music.
HS II- Developing
2RE Describe how the use of elements of music affects the aesthetic impact of a music selection.
3RE Discuss how the purpose, meaning and value of music changes because of the impact of life experiences.
5RE Describe the use of elements of music as they relate to expression in a varied repertoire of music.
6RE Incorporate technology when possible in assessing music performances.
HS III- Intermediate
2RE Discuss how people differ in their responses to the aesthetic qualities of performance including their personal responses.
3RE Assess how elements of music are used in a work to create images or evoke emotions.
4RE Explain how the creative process is used in similar and different ways in the arts.
5RE Evaluate how musical forms are influenced by history.
6RE Compare and contrast a musical work with another work of art (e.g., dance, drama or visual art) from the same culture on the basis of cultural influences.
7RE Evaluate how musical forms and performance practices are influenced by culture and history.
HS IV- Mastery
2RE Describe how compositional devices and techniques (e.g., motives, imitation, suspension and retrograde) are used to provide unity, variety, tension and release in a music work.
3RE Discuss how people differ in their response to musical experiences based upon culture, environment, values and personal experiences